MANA'S SHORT STORY SERIES LIST ON SIDE COLUMN

MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! Podcast: A Variety of Early Works By African American Writers

MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! is a special segment of MANA that features podcasts on literature produced by African American writers in the 18th century and beyond. 

Through literature, the writers, whether free or slaves, realized their identity and expressed their individuality at a time when African Americans were only viewed as mere property.

Listen to the podcast below in which MANA's DR C reads: 

1. The poem, "An Evening Thought: Salvation by Christ, with Penitential Cries" by Jupiter Hammon (c. 1711-1806), and published in New York in 1761. Hammon is considered to be the founder of African American literature. "An Evening Thought," was the first poem published by an African American in North America. In a previous post, BLACK LIT ALIVE! features another poem by Jupiter. Go HERE to read the work, "Essay on Slavery, with justification to Divine providence, that God Rules over all things."

2. The poem, "On Being Brought From Africa to America," by Phillis Wheatley (c. 1753-1784), the first African American author of a book of poetry. Go HERE to listen to a previous BLACK LIT ALIVE! podcast regarding Wheatley. DR C reads "On Being Brought From Africa to America," twice in this latest podcast. 

3. More excerpts from The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African by Gustavus Vassa. The book was first published in 1789 in London. Listen to Part 1 and Part 2 of a previous BLACK LIT ALIVE! podcast on Vassa. 

4. Excerpts from A Narrative of the Adventures and Escape of Moses, Roper, from American Slavery by Moses Roper (c.1815-April 15.1891). Roper's book was one of the major early books about life as a slave in the United States. 

5. The poem, "On Liberty and Slavery" by George Moses Horton (1798-1883), who is considered "the Black bard of North Carolina." Go HERE to listen to a previous BLACK LIT ALIVE! podcast on Horton.


Follow along with DR C as she recites:

MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! Featuring Frederick Douglass and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper

 MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! is a special segment of MANA, which will have podcasts on literature produced by African American writers in the 18th century and beyond. 

Through literature, the writers, whether free or slaves, realized their identity and expressed their individuality at a time when African Americans were only viewed as mere property. 

In this podcast, MANA’s DR C reads excerpts from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave. Douglass (c. February 1818 - February 20, 1895) was an abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. He escaped from slavery in Maryland and later became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York. 

Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (September 24, 1825 - February 22, 1911) was one of the first African American women to be published in the United States. Born free in Baltimore, Maryland, she became an abolitionist, suffragist, teacher, public speaker, poet, and writer. Harper made literary history when her short story, "Two Offers" was published in the Anglo-African in 1859. This was the first short story published by a black woman. 

Listen to DR C's podcast where she reads excerpts from Douglass' narrative and Harper's poem, "The Slave Auction" and "The Dying Bondman":


Follow along with DR C as she recites excerpts from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, and Harper's poems:

MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! Featuring Henry Bibb and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper

MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! is a special segment of MANA, which will have podcasts on literature produced by African American writers in the 18th century and beyond. 

Through literature, the writers, whether free or slaves, realized their identity and expressed their individuality at a time when African Americans were only viewed as mere property. 

In this podcast, MANA’s DR C continues the discussion of Henry Bibb (May 10, 1815 - August 1, 1854), who was born to Mildred Jackson, an enslaved woman on a Cantalonia, Kentucky plantation. His people told him his white father was James Bibb, a Kentucky state senator, but Henry never knew him. Henry Bibb had six younger brothers who were all sold. 

He later became an abolitionist after escaping from slavery and into Canada. Bibb founded the abolitionist newspaper, The Voice of the Fugitive. He returned to the United States to lecture against slavery. Bibb details his life history in his book, Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, An American Slave, Written By Himself. 

Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (September 24, 1825 - February 22, 1911) was one of the first African American women to be published in the United States. Born free in Baltimore, Maryland, she became an abolitionist, suffragist, teacher, public speaker, poet, and writer. Harper's short story, "Two Offers" was published in the Anglo-African in 1859, making literary history as the first short story published by a black woman. 

Listen to DR C's podcast where she reads excerpts from Bibb's narrative and Harper's poem, "The Slave Mother": 


Follow along with DR C as she recites excerpts from Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, An American Slave, Written By Himself and the poem "The Slave Mother"

MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! Continues With Olaudah Equiano Or Gustavus Vassa Part 2

 MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! is a special segment of MANA, which will have podcasts on literature produced by African American writers in the 18th century and beyond. 

Through literature, the writers, whether free or slaves, realized their identity and expressed their individuality at a time when African Americans were only viewed as mere property. 

In this podcast, MANA’s DR C continues the discussion of Olaudah Equiano, whose name was later changed to Gustavus Vassa. Equiano was born in the kingdom of Benin, which is part of Guinea, a country in Western Africa. 

The writer details the kidnapping and enslavement in his autobiography, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African. The book was first published in 1789 in London.

Listen to DR C's podcast where she reads excerpts from Equiano's autobiography: 


Follow along with DR C as she recites the excerpts below:

MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! Featuring Olaudah Equiano Or Gustavus Vassa Part 1

MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! is a special segment of MANA, which will have podcasts on literature produced by African American writers in the 18th century and beyond. 

Through literature, the writers, whether free or slaves, realized their identity and expressed their individuality at a time when African Americans were only viewed as mere property. 

In this podcast, MANA’s DR C presents the work of Olaudah Equiano, whose name was later changed to Gustavus Vassa. Equiano was born in the kingdom of Benin, which is part of Guinea, a country in Western Africa. 

The writer details the kidnapping and enslavement in his autobiography, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African. The book was first published in 1789 in London.

Listen to DR C's podcast where she reads excerpts from Equiano's autobiography: 


Follow along with DR C as she recites the excerpts below:

MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! Featuring Poets Jupiter Hammon and George Moses Horton

 MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! is a special segment of MANA, which will have podcasts on literature produced by African American writers in the early 1700s and 1800s. 

Through literature, the writers, whether free or slaves, realized their identity and expressed their individuality at a time when African Americans were only viewed as mere property. In this podcast, MANA’s DR C presents the discussion and works of Jupiter Hammon and George Moses Horton. 

Hammon (1711-ca.-1806) is known as a founder of African American literature since his poem published in 1761 in New York was the first by an African American in North America. 

Horton (1798-1883), considered "the Black bard of North Carolina," was a slave in North Carolina. Horton's first collection of poetry, The Hope of Liberty (1829) was intended to earn enough to purchase his freedom but failed to do so. He did not become free until 1865 when the Emancipation Proclamation reached North Carolina. 

Listen to DR C's podcast where she reads and discusses the works of Jupiter Hammon and George Moses Horton: 



Follow DR C in reading the poem "Love," by George Moses Horton:

MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! Continues With Lucy Terry Prince and Phillis Wheatley

Welcome to MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! is a special podcast on literature produced by African American writers in the 18th century and beyond.

Through literature, the writers, whether free or slaves, realized their identity and expressed their individuality at a time when African Americans were only viewed as mere property. 

In this podcast, MarketingNewAuthors.com's Dr. Fairy C. Hayes-Scott, also known as DR C, continues the discussion of Lucy Terry Prince (c.1730-1821)believed to be the author of the first poem composed by an African American woman, and Phillis Wheatley (c. 1753-1784), the first African American author of a book of poetry. 

When did slaves actually reach the American shores? Did Lucy Terry Prince, a slave, actually write her ballad, "Bars Fights" at a time when slaves were not allowed to learn how to read or write? What was Phillis Wheatley trying to get across in her poem, "Imagination?" DR C discusses this and more in the podcast below: 


Listen to DR C’s podcast where she reads the works of Lucy Terry Prince and Phillis Wheatley. 




Follow along with DR C as she recites the poems below:

Buy One, Get One Free! Take Advantage of MANA's Book Sale

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has posed many challenges. However, there are some good things that can happen even in the worst of times. One of those good things is MANA's book sale.

The books listed below entertain, inform, and function as works that adults and children will find valuable; 
all you have to do is purchase the ebook of BARE ESSENTIALS, 19th ed. at full price and choose any of the books below for FREE! (Click on the title to preview the book)

BARE ESSENTIALS is an excellent handbook for those needing help with their grammar or writing skills. This is a supplementary resource that students, instructors, writers, and parents can use. 

Get one of the following books for free:

1) AUTISM-POETIC PRIDE by "Queen" Anya Rutz. This book shows what an individual with autism can share through poetry.


2) GRANDDADDY by Cavis Adams. This story details the influence of a Black grandfather has on his family, particularly his young grandson who visits his granddaddy in Alabama and experiences the South for the first time. 


3) THE MEDICI HEIRS by Rita Gitik. This book shows the strength of Juliana Scott, a descendant of the famous Medici family, who fights against her mother who had her imprisoned in a mental institution.


4) SELLING MEMORIES by Rita Gitik. This book combines poetry and short stories that share literature that serves as guidance for generations to come.

Welcome to MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE!

MANA's BLACK LIT ALIVE! is a special segment of MANA, which will have podcasts on literature produced by African American writers in the 18th century and beyond. 

Through literature, the writers, whether free or slaves, realized their identity and expressed their individuality at a time when African Americans were only viewed as mere property. 

In this podcast, MANA’s DR C presents the works of Lucy Terry Prince and Phillis Wheatley.  


Lucy Terry Prince (c.1730-1821) was taken from Africa and became a slave in Rhode Island. She is believed to be the author of the first poem composed by an African American woman. Prince's poem, "Bars Fight," is a ballad about an attack by American Indians on white families on August 25, 1746, in Deerfield, Massachusetts. Prince was enslaved in Deerfield at the time. The attack occurred in an area of Deerfield called, “The Bars,” which was a term, at that time, for a meadow.


Phillis Wheatley (c. 1753-1784) was the first African American author of a book of poetry. She was also the first African American woman to achieve an international reputation as a writer. Wheatley was born in West Africa, sent to North America, and sold into slavery when she was either 7 years old or 8 years old. She was bought by the Wheatley family of Boston, who taught her how to read and write. 


In Wheatley's poem, "On Imagination," Wheatley views imagination as having power over an individual’s creativity, love, and soul, among other things. Wheatley calls upon Helicon, to help in composing a song about imagination. In Greek mythology, Helicon is important to the Muses and seen as a source of poetic inspiration. 


Some poetry analyses view Fancy as the freedom that releases the writer from the fetters placed on her, while Winter symbolizes the reality of slavery that restricts the opportunities brought by imagination. Wheatley calls for the "unequal lay" or inequality between "reality" and imagination to "cease."


Listen to DR C’s podcast where she reads the works of Lucy Terry Prince and Phillis Wheatley. 




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Follow along with DR C as she recites the poems below: